Month: August 2018

Bliss of travel

The Girne Fine Arts Museum is situated to the west of the town, near the military hospital. The building was erected in 1938, and opened as a museum in 1975. The museum contains European paintings and ceramics, together with objects from the Far East. Interior of Girne fine arts museum Fine Arts Museum Display. The items in the museum are displayed in three groups. There are various styles of oil paintings in the first group, some of which are original, and some are simply copies. The second group is the richest displayed in the museum. These works are from the Far East, and give us some idea of the captivating elegance of the art. Decorated with mother of pearl and ivory on a lacquered surface, silk materials decorated with colourful silk threads, handiworks, pictures on material and paper, metal and porcelain works are some of the products which can be seen.
European porcelain works can be seen in the third group, especially dinner sets, jugs, vases and various lamps.
Cypriots have come to think of the beauty of the Karpaz as sacred, like the Apostolos Andreas Monastery at the tip of the peninsula. The monastery is a key religious site, and the focus for Greek Cypriot pilgrimages on the important festivals of Orthodox Easter and St Andrew’s day. A fortified monastery stood on this craggy shoreline in the 12th century, from where Isaac Commenos negotiated his surrender to Richard the Lionheart. The oldest surviving building is a 15th century seaside chapel, now essentially a crypt below the main icon-decorated church.
To the north of Dipkarpaz lie the spectacular seafront ruins of Ayios Philon, part of what was once Carpasia. Stones from the ancient city were used to build a 10th century church, the ruins of which still stand, and mosaics are still visible from a far earlier basilica.

Just five miles away are the remnants of Aphendrika, said to have been one of the island’s foremost cities, where you can see Cyprus’s oldest surviving domed church.
Mediterranean on your right, your left, and ahead! Don’t forget to take your camera with you!

Readers’ travel photography competition

In many societies there are important distinctions between holidays designated by governments and holidays designated by religious institutions. For example, in many predominantly Christian nations, government-designed holidays may center on Christian holidays, though non-Christians may instead observe religious holidays associated with their faith. In some cases, a holiday may only be nominally observed. For example, many Jews in the Americas and Europe treat the relatively minor Jewish holiday of Hanukkah as a “working holiday”, changing very little of their daily routines for this day.

A holiday is a day set aside by custom or by law on which normal activities, especially business or work including school, are suspended or reduced. Generally, holidays are intended to allow individuals to celebrate or commemorate an event or tradition of cultural or religious significance. Holidays may be designated by governments, religious institutions, or other groups or organizations. The degree to which normal activities are reduced by a holiday may depend on local laws, customs, the type of job being held or personal choices.

The concept of holidays often originated in connection with religious observances. The intention of a holiday was typically to allow individuals to tend to religious duties associated with important dates on the calendar. In most modern societies, however, holidays serve as much of a recreational function as any other weekend days or activities.

The Bufavento Castle

As the name implies, this castle is buffeted by the winds, and standing at 3,100 feet it is the highest and most inaccessible of the three castles. To get there, take the turning that is signposted at the top of the Five Finger mountain pass and follow the route for a little over four miles. All along this approach road there are magnificent views over the Mesaoria plain and the City of Lefkosa (Nicosia). Goats will be seen browsing among the bushes and somewhere a sleepy goatherd will be having a nap under a tree.

For most of the way, the castle will be visible, but tantalisingly for quite a while it never seems to get any closer. As the route twists and turns round a rocky bluff, the castle will disappear and then suddenly it is in view again. There is a slight turn to the right that accesses the car park where there is a solitary olive tree and a memorial to the crew of an aircraft that perished in a mountaintop crash in 1988. This is where you leave the car and start to walk.

There are gently graded concrete steps, interspersed with low walls upon which to rest from the arduous climb. There are always wonderful views in every direction to have a chance to pause and get ones breath back or seek out the flowers that grow on the hillside. As with the other two castles the terrain is rich in flora, and the best time to see it is the Spring.

Categories: Car Rental General Nature

Individuals to celebrate.

A holiday is a day set aside by custom or by law on which normal activities, especially business or work including school, are suspended or reduced. Generally, holidays are intended to allow individuals to celebrate or commemorate an event or tradition of cultural or religious significance.
Holidays may be designated by travel agents, religious institutions, or other groups or organizations.
The concept of holidays often originated in connection with sightseeing.

Mahalla or Parish of Nicosia

Arab Ahmet is a Neighbourhood, Quarter, Mahalla or Parish of Nicosia, Cyprus and the mosque situated therein. Both the Quarter and the mosque are named after Arab Ahmet Pasha, one of the Turkish commanders in the Ottoman conquest of Nicosia. It is spelled Arabahmet in Turkish and Άραπ Άχμετ in Greek.

At the last Census (2011) it had a population of 3,550. It covers the historic Arab Ahmet neighbourhood in the west of Nicosia within the walls, plus an area west of that outside the walls up to the municipal boundary

The population in 1946 was 2,617 Together with the neighbouring Karamanzade Neighbourhood, it was part of the predominantly Armenian area of Nicosia.

The Neighbourhood outside the walls, is now delimited by the Dept. of Lands and Surveys as follows: The boundary line passes from the point of the Quirini or Cephane (Jeb Khane) bastion to the roundabout just north of the bastion. Namely, the roundabout at the corner of the former site of the Turkish Cemetery, now the site of the Turkish Embassy in Cyprus.[10] From there the boundary continues along Bedrettin Demirel Avenue (Hilarion Avenue) for about a mile to the old municipal boundary. The boundary is then coterminous with the municipal border in a south-westerly direction until the vicinity of the Central Prison. From here the boundary passes south of the prison due east, via Norman St., thence along Dereboyu Avenue and Markos Drakos Ave. until the point of the Roccas bastion. This area includes the Ledra Palace Hotel, British High Commission, Central Prison and the Turkish Cypriot Assembly of the Republic. Parts of the neighborhood outside the walls in the north have been detached from the Arab Ahmet neighbourhood and are now considered parts of Köşklüçiftlik.

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